Changes between Version 1 and Version 5 of Ticket #21942


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Timestamp:
Apr 14, 2017, 8:07:14 PM (3 years ago)
Author:
linda
Comment:

I'm done with sitemapping. Here are some things I didn't want to forget about:

  • observations about site structure along the way:
    • 38 links on the front page, which leads to 30+ pages--that's a bit too much.
    • 3-4 ways to get to one page (header, footer, inline, from a subpage), sometimes with different text ('volunteer' and 'get involved' lead to the same page).
    • there are site headers, subheaders, AND side headers, which compete for attention.
    • the header, subheader, and footer stay the same throughout the site, and are visible everywhere.
    • the side headers sometimes appear, and also are different depending on which page you are on (https://www.torproject.org/docs/documentation.html.en vs https://www.torproject.org/about/overview.html.en).
  • ideas about structure for the new www.torproject.org
    • keep it simple: nothing more than sub-sub-sub pages (3 clicks away)
    • less is more: reduce the different amount of content on each page, and expand on the select few topics that remain on each page.
    • consistency: use the same phrasing to refer to the same pages and topics throughout.
    • minimize: use only a header and footer.
    • put things in the footer that are not as important, and link to a leaf page. The current footer links to pages linked to by the header, which is kind of confusing.
    • organize by target audience: a lot of the existing content can be organized into the developer, support, and outreach portals. (for instance, the manuals, project pages, wiki, can all be in the developer portal.)

The above observations and ideas are just my ideas, and have not been decided on as final.

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  • Ticket #21942

    • Property Status changed from assigned to closed
    • Property Resolution changed from to fixed
    • Property Type changed from defect to task
  • Ticket #21942 – Description

    v1 v5  
    1616There was existing work done to sitemap the website (#10591), and this was taken into consideration. The previous work was used to check that there were not any sites that were not accounted for, but since the digraphs were not generated in the same way (the old method did add nodes for external links, whereas this digraph does, for instance), they do not look identical.
    1717
    18 = Results =
    19 * a digraph sitemap of www.torproject.org
     18= Results and observations=
     19* a digraph sitemap of www.torproject.org (key: black = webpage, grey = external webpage, pink = duplicate link to a webpage).
    2020
    2121[[Image(tpo-digraph-before.png, 600px)]]
    2222
    23 * observations about site structure along the way:
    24  - 38 links on the front page, which leads to 30+ pages--that's a bit too much.
    25  - 3-4 ways to get to one page (header, footer, inline, from a subpage), sometimes with different text ('volunteer' and 'get involved' lead to the same page).
    26  - there are site headers, subheaders, AND side headers, which compete for attention.
    27  - the header, subheader, and footer stay the same throughout the site, and are visible everywhere.
    28  - the side headers sometimes appear, and also are different depending on which page you are on (https://www.torproject.org/docs/documentation.html.en vs https://www.torproject.org/about/overview.html.en).
     23The three main observations about the structure were that it was abnormally structured, too flat, and messily interlinked. More details about this below: 
    2924
    30 * ideas about structure for the new www.torproject.org
    31  - keep it simple: nothing more than sub-sub-sub pages (3 clicks away)
    32  - less is more: reduce the different amount of content on each page, and expand on the select few topics that remain on each page.
    33  - consistency: use the same phrasing to refer to the same pages and topics throughout.
    34  - minimize: use only a header and footer.
    35  - put things in the footer that are not as important, and link to a leaf page. The current footer links to pages linked to by the header, which is kind of confusing.
    36  - organize by target audience: a lot of the existing content can be organized into the developer, support, and outreach portals. (for instance, the manuals, project pages, wiki, can all be in the developer portal.) 
     251. The current structure of the website does not follow any of the standard design patterns:
     26
     27[[Image(an-example-hierarchy.png, 400px)]]
     28An example of a hierarchy pattern, additional ones are [http://adellefrank.com/blog/review-information-architecture-patternsh here].
     29
     30Currently, the website structure is asymmetrical, and of various depths. This can be irritating to users where some pages just "end" whereas other pages require 2-3 clicks to find the information that they need.
     31
     322. the website structure is very flat.
     33
     34[[Image(flat-vs-deep.png, 600px)]]
     35This conveys the same amount of pages, but in a flat vs deep hierarchy.
     36
     37Content is more discoverable when it's not buried under multiple intervening layers. Users can become overwhelmed with cluttered menus. Hierarchies can be helpful if categories are specific and do not overlap, which I do think is the case for many of the content in torproject.org.
     38
     393. there is a lot of inter-linking and duplicate links to various pages.
     40
     41You can get to to a pages' subpage from another page's subpage. There are links with different text ("learn more" and "about tor" both lead to the same place) that lead to the same place. On one page, there are multiple ways to get to the same page (you can get to the donate page from the header, subheader, and footer, and occasionally a side bar tip). All of these things are confusing, and we should find out where the best placement for something is, and keep it there.