wiki:org/meetings/2017Montreal/ParticipantGuidelines

Tor Meeting Participant Guidelines

  • Demonstrate respect for others at all times: Effective work, sharing and learning can only take place when interactions are built on a foundation of respect for others.
  • It will never be acceptable to insult others or demonstrate disrespect, even in moments of philosophical disagreement and passionate exchange.
  • Focus on listening: we are all passionate about this work and have much to say, but it is in listening and understanding how others are thinking about technology and strategy, and any challenges they are facing, that we become stronger as a project and a network. In particular, it is never ok to interrupt.
  • Please refrain from side conversations while others are speaking.
  • Avoid debate during sessions: It is always ok to disagree and let others know you think differently on a point. Many among us possess strong beliefs on matters of technology, politics, philosophy and community. But time is precious here, and debate is not time well spent, especially for those who are spectators. When you disagree, "agree to disagree", and move on to discuss shared needs and shared opportunities.
  • Honor the posted schedule by arriving promptly for sessions so that others are not made to wait. When we take a 15-minute break, please be back in circle ready to go after 15 minutes, not off checking email or smoking a cigarette. Do email and voicemail earlier in the break instead of later :)
  • The Tor Meeting is dedicated to providing a harassment-free conference experience for everyone, regardless of gender, gender identity and expression, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, age or religion. We do not tolerate harassment of conference participants in any form. Conference participants violating these rules may be sanctioned or expelled from the meeting, and future meetings, at the discretion of the meeting organizers.
  • Actively strive to include everyone present in group discussions. The event should not be viewed as a competition to prove who is most knowledgeable, but rather as an opportunity to broaden our networks of skill, collaboration and understanding. Strive to ensure that no one is left out, and speak in language that is accessible to all.
  • Language: speak slowly and clearly for those whose native language is not English, and please define acronyms and technical jargon when using them in discussion if you have any sense that some participants may lack familiarity.
  • Follow the "Rule of 1": when you speak, make 1 point and then let others speak
  • Follow the "Rule of n": when in a group of "n" people, speak "1/nth" of the time.
  • Ask questions early and often: The event is convened specifically for the benefit of those who need to know more about developing, supporting, explaining and advocating for Tor and related projects. Participants should feel free to ask any question at any time; there shall be no such thing as a "stupid question".
  • Don't hang and talk with your friends by default, instead talk to strangers and those you know less well, who are hopefully friends you have not yet met.
  • Ask your questions: questions are the currency of collaboration; never suffer in silence when something is unclear. Asking questions is an act of leadership.
  • Embrace a spirit of sharing: We believe that everyone present has valuable knowledge and experience to share, and encourage each participant to please contribute their wisdom to the mix. All of us know something and none of us knows everything.
Last modified 12 days ago Last modified on Oct 7, 2017, 5:51:34 PM